Math Placement

Be sure to speak with your advisor as to what level math course you should start in. Refer to the chart below only as a reference for what courses you will be eligible to take upon admittance to the UI.

ACT Math

SAT Math

COMPASS

Places you in:

0 - 18

200 - 460

Algebra 0 - 35

Math 108 or 123

19 - 21

470 - 510

Algebra 36 - 60 or
College Algebra 0 - 44

Math 108, 123, or 130

22 - 26

520 - 600

Algebra 61 or above
College Algebra 45 - 48

Math 108, 123, 130, or 143

27 - 28

610 - 640

College Algebra 49 - 50

Math 108, 123, 130, 143, or 160

29 - 36

650 - 800

College Algebra 51 or above and Trigonometry 51 or above

Math 108, 123, 130, 143, 160, 170, or 176

Credit is also awarded for AP Calculus and IB Mathematics exam scores. Refer to the AP & IB credit equivalency pages if you have taken an AP or IB mathematics exam.

If you are unsatisfied with your SAT or ACT score, you are encouraged to challenge your placement by scoring high enough on the computerized COMPASS math test. You can contact the UI Counseling and Testing Center, 306 Continuing Education Building, at 885-6716 for information about taking the test.

 

 English Placement

The University of Idaho requires that all undergraduate degree-seeking students must be enrolled in English 090, 101, or 102 in their first semester in residence and in subsequent semesters until they have passed English 102.

ACT English

SAT Verbal

COMPASS Writing

CEEB AP English

Places you in:

1 - 17

200 - 440

0 - 67

n/a

English 090

18 - 24

450 - 560

68 - 94

n/a

English 101

25 - 30

570 - 690

95 - 99

3 - 4

English 102

31 - 36

700 - 800

n/a

5

Exempt

 

CLEP General & Subject Exams

Score

Places you in:

CLEP English Composition Test

50+

English 102

CLEP Freshman College Composition Exam

53+

Students placed into English 102 will receive credit for English 101 once they have completed 102, and students who are exempt will receive credit for both English 101 and 102 after completion of their first semester. Transfer credit is awarded for CEEB AP exam scores and university credit is awarded for COMPASS, ACT, and SAT scores. Credit given for English 101 and 102 comes with a grade of Pass (P) and does not affect GPA.

For financial aid purposes, English 090 does not count toward the minimum twelve credit load to be considered a full-time student, and is not considered college credit. Therefore, for financial aid purposes the student must register for twelve credits in addition to English 090 to remain a full-time student.  Additionally, there is a $250 special fee associated with taking English 090.

Students are encouraged to challenge their placement if the feel they have not been placed in the correct class. The English Department website details how to challenge a placement.

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Challenging your Placement in English 090:  

You may challenge your placement in English 090 by either of two methods:

 

Taking the Writing Skills Placement test of COMPASS.  A score between 68 and 94 will place you in English 101; a score of 95 to 99 will place you in English 102.  To take this test, go to the Student Counseling and Testing Center (located in the Continuing Education Building, Room 306) or call 208-885-6716 to reserve a time.  You should allow 30 to 45 minutes to take this test.  The results are given immediately.  The test is given on any normal working day.  During the regular school year, their hours are 8:00 to 5:00, M-F, but in the summer, their hours are 7:30 am to 4:30 pm, M-F.

 

Writing a good placement essay during the first week of class.

You should be registered for English 090 in order to take this placement test.

For fall 2007, the placement essay will be administered during the second day of class. You will receive instructions for taking this test in class on the first day.

You will receive the topic for the placement essay on the first day of your English 090 class. You are asked to think of the general approach you will take to the topic, formulate an outline or other organizational strategy, and write the first paragraph of the essay before coming to your second class. 

This first paragraph should demonstrate your ability to produce carefully edited writing--the sort that you would write for the final version of an essay.  You write the rest of this essay, which should be 500 to 600 words long, in a blue book during your second class (classes are 50 minutes long for Monday-Wednesday-Friday classes).

In order for your essay to be considered excellent, the opening paragraph should introduce the topic in an interesting way and lead up to a thesis statement that is not self evident.  Your essay should consist of coherent paragraphs that contain examples to support your ideas.  The essay should advance a reasonable argument, one that considers your audience and even probable objections a reader might make to your assertions.  Your sentences should be generally clear.  Although your editing does not need to be perfect, your spelling and punctuation should be reasonably correct.

By asking you to write this placement essay, we get a sample of your writing ability early in the semester.   We also get a chance to be sure be sure that you are properly placed in the course for which you are registered.

Even if you do not succeed in passing out of the course, this placement essay gives your instructor a good idea of what your writing strengths and weaknesses are.

Challenging English 101:

You may challenge your placement in English 101 by either of two methods: 

 

Scoring between 95 and 99 on the Writing Skills Placement test of COMPASS.  To take this test, go to the Student Counseling and Testing Center (located in the Continuing Education Building, Room 306) or call 208-885-6716 to reserve a time.  You should allow 30 to 45 minutes to take this test.  The results are given immediately.  The test is given on any normal working day.  During the regular school year, their hours are 8:00 to 5:00, M-F, but in the summer, their hours are 7:30 am to 4:30 pm, M-F.


 

Writing an excellent placement essay on the second day of your English 101 class.

By asking you to write this placement essay, we get a sample of your writing ability early in the semester.   We also get a chance to be sure be sure that you are properly placed in the course for which you are registered.

You receive the topic for the placement essay on the first day of your 101 class.   You are asked to think of the general approach you will take to the topic, formulate an outline or other organizational strategy, and write the first paragraph of the essay before coming to your second class. 

This first paragraph should demonstrate your ability to produce carefully edited writing--the sort that you would write for the final version of an essay.  You write the rest of this essay, which should be 600 to 700 words long, in a blue book during your second class (classes are 50 minutes long for Monday-Wednesday-Friday classes).

In order for your essay to be considered excellent, the opening paragraph should introduce the topic in an interesting way and lead up to a thesis statement that is not self evident.  Because the opening paragraph was written out of class when you had time to edit your work carefully, this paragraph should be typed and contain virtually no mechanical errors (spelling, punctuation).  The rest of the essay should consist of well-developed and coherent paragraphs that contain selected and sufficient examples, illustrations, and explanations to support your ideas.  The essay should advance an argument that is reasonable and consistent, one that considers your audience and probable objections a reader might make to your assertions.  Your sentences should be clear and well structured.  Although your editing does not need to be perfect, you should in general be following the conventions for edited American English and the spelling and punctuation should be reasonably correct.

Even if you do not succeed in passing out of the course, this placement essay gives your instructor a good idea of what your writing strengths and weaknesses are.

 

 Chemistry Placement

You can place into Chemistry 111 in one of two ways:

·         Receive an A or B in a high school chemistry class, and one of the following:

o    ACT math score of at least 25

o    SAT math score of at least 560

o    COMPASS College Algebra score of at least 49

o    A grade of at least a C in MATH 143, 160, or 170.

·         Or pass the Chemistry Fundamentals Exam (Testing Dates Below)

If you are unable to place into Chemistry 111 by either of the above two methods, you must first complete Chemistry 050.

For financial aid purposes, Chem 050 does not count towards the minimum twelve credit load to be considered a full-time student, and is not considered college credit. Therefore, for financial aid purposes a student must register for twelve credits in addition to Chem 050 to remain a full-time student.  Additionally, there is a $105 special fee associated with taking Chem 050.

 

Testing Dates

Chemistry Placement Exam Information

The chemistry placement exam is administered by the department of chemistry. The date and location of the next exam is given below.

  1. You may take this exam more than one time under the following conditions:
     
 

You must wait A MINIMUM of two months to take this exam again.
 

 

The exam may be repeated ONLY during the scheduled times.
 

 

Students enrolled in Chemistry 050 in a given semester are not eligible to take the placement exam when it is offered during pre-registration advising for the next semester.
 

  1. In order to pass this exam you must get a score of 60% or better. (The "real" test will have 25 questions, so you must get a minimum 15 out of 25 questions correct.)
     
  2. You are not allowed to remove the exam or any related materials from the test site.
     
  3. The exam will be changed each time it is given.
     
  4. In order to take the exam, you need to bring a photo ID, non-text entry scientific calculator, and a #2 pencil
     

The chemistry placement exam consists of 25 multiple choice questions that are designed to test your knowledge of basic chemistry. Topics covered on the exam are: significant figures, the metric system, dimensional analysis (unit conversion), density, nomenclature of simple inorganic compounds and common acids, percent mass calculations, scientific notation, balancing equations, molar mass (molecular weight), the mole, stoichiometry, molarity, dilutions, basic algebra, and graphing.  You should have had most of these topics in your high school chemistry course.

The placement exam is given four times a year.  Exams are usually given on the first Tuesday of the fall semester, the first Thursday of the spring semester, in November, and in April.

 

 Foreign Language Placement

Advanced Placement

Some entering students, because of their high school preparation in foreign languages, are able to begin the sequence of university language courses at a higher level than the first introductory course.  The advanced placement policy will grant these students the credit hours for any courses they skip, provided they earn a C or better in the university course in which they enroll.  This applies to any course up to the following third year courses:  French 301 or 302, German 301 or 302, Spanish 301 or 302.  First- and second-year UI language courses carry 4 credits each.  It is therefore possible for a student to receive 4, 8, 12, or 16 vertically related credits in any one language as explained below.  Vertical credits are available only to undergraduate students.

 

The chart below will help you determine where to begin your Foreign Language studies at UI based on the number of years you have studied a language in high school.  However, the numbers of years of high school study are not always an accurate indicator of placement.  For this reason, we ask that students with previous language study verify their placement by taking a computer-assisted placement exam at the beginning of the semester in which they enroll.  When possible, students should take this placement exam before enrolling in their first UI language course.  These tests are available to suggest proper placement in foreign language courses, however they do not allow you to “test out” of courses.  The university’s policy requires that the student earn a C or better in the university course to be awarded vertically related credits.

 

 

 

# of Years of High School Language Study

Recommended Language Course in which to Enroll at UI

Credits Awarded

Courses for which Vertical Credits are Awarded

Total Credits Earned

1

French 102
German 102
Spanish 102

4 + 4
(course skipped)

French 101
German 101
Spanish 101

8

2

French 201
German 201
Spanish 201

4 + 8
(courses skipped)

French 101, 102
German 101, 102
Spanish 101, 102

12

3

French 202
German 202
Spanish 202

4 + 12
(courses skipped)

French 101, 102, 201
German 101, 102, 201
Spanish 101, 102, 201

16

4

French 301
or 302
German 301
or 302
Spanish 301
or 302

3 + 16
(courses skipped)

French 101, 102, 201, 202
German 101, 102, 201, 202
Spanish 101, 102, 201, 202

19

Example:

Student John Smith completed two years of French in High School. His teacher recommends he take advantage of the advanced placement policy and so he enrolls in French 201, the third semesters course in the French sequence. He earns a B in French 201 and will receive 4 credits for 201 plus an extra 8 credits (with the grade of P) for the courses he skipped (French 101 and French 102) for a total of 12 credits.

Procedures:

1.  Students must request vertical credits on the “Vertically-Related Credit Application” available through the Registrar’s home page on the UI website.  A $35.00 application fee and $25.00 per credit is charged to the student’s account.

2. The appropriate time to request advanced study credits is near the end of the semester in which the student will complete the higher-level course or after it has been completed with a C or better.